Washington Post celebrates doctor who travels 800 miles to perform abortions as a hero

The Washington Post recently celebrated as a hero an abortion doctor who travels over 800 miles every month to terminate pregnancies in “underserved” communities.

In a lengthy commemoration published on Thursday, the Post documented the brave “social justice” work of Dr. Meera Shah, 38-year-old chief medical officer at Planned Parenthood Hudson Peconic in Hudson, N.Y.

Every month, Shah boards a plane from New York and travels to South Bend, Indiana, to provide what she views as basic health care to her eagerly waiting patients.

According to the Post, “She is among about 50 doctors who travel regularly to 20 states, logging hundreds of miles, crisscrossing time zones to provide abortions in places where patients would otherwise not have access.”

“Shah and other doctors who do such work say that their services have never been needed more — and that their commitment has never been stronger, with the nation at the most significant moment for abortion rights since Roe v. Wade made the procedure legal in 1973,” the paper added.

This week, the Supreme Court held oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, a case involving a Mississippi law that bans abortions after 15 weeks. If the law is upheld by the high court, it would almost certainly accompany a major rollback of abortion rights established in the landmark ruling, Roe v. Wade. The prospect has abortion advocates in full-blown panic mode.

In September, as a newly-passed ban on abortions was set to take effect in Texas, clinics “race[d] to perform as many abortions as possible” before time ran out. With Roe v. Wade‘s fate hanging in the balance, a similar urgency seems to drive Shah to make her monthly commute.

“The commute is exhausting, of course, but I’ve seen firsthand how this care is so important to a patient’s autonomy over their own body,” Shah remarked to the Post.

On one recent trip, she missed her connecting flight and scrambled to find an Uber that could take her the remaining distance to South Bend.

“Patients may have taken a day off of work or traveled hundreds of miles or set up child care,” she recounted. “I have to make it.”

Shah, a family medicine doctor specializing in sexual and reproductive health, hopes to have children of her own one day, the Post noted. But she reportedly feels just as strongly that pregnant people should be allowed to make their own decisions when it comes to their bodies. Evidently, she doesn’t feel that the unborn should be afforded the same right.

The glowing piece casts Shah and doctors like her as warriors for a righteous cause. But at no point in the article is anything positive said about the tireless work that pro-life advocates perform to defend unborn lives.

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